Marijuana : Good or Bad?

According to the National Institutes of Health, people have used marijuana, or cannabis, to treat their ailments for at least 3,000 years. However, the Food and Drug Administration have not deemed marijuana safe or effective in the treatment of any medical condition, although cannabidiol, a substance that is present in marijuana, received approval in June 2018 as a treatment for some types of epilepsy.

Marijuana is being increasingly legalized in the U.S., but is it safe?

This tension, between a widespread belief that marijuana is an effective treatment for a wide assortment of ailments and a lack of scientific knowledge on its effects, has been somewhat exacerbated in recent times by a drive toward legalization.

Twenty-nine states plus the District of Columbia have now made marijuana available for medical — and, in some states, recreational — purposes.

What are the benefits vs. risks of marijuana?

Just as synthetic drugs can help some conditions and not others, marijuana isn’t a one-size-fits-all line of treatment. It’s thought that marijuana’s benefits come from some of its compounds called cannabinoids, such as cannabidiol (CBD).

CBD is one of the most widely studied cannabinoids in marijuana. CBD is also found in another related plant called hemp.

One major difference between CBD and marijuana is that the former only contains a trace amount of the cannabinoid tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). This compound is best known for its hallucinogenic effects on the brain.

Cannabis plants may contain up to 40 percent CBD. CBD is thought to have anti-inflammatory effects on the central nervous system. This can translate to multiple benefits in the body.

Still, there remains concern over the effects of THC in traditional marijuana. This is due to the fact that it can have stimulating or depressant effects in some people, which may lead to other side effects.

Thus, when considering marijuana for any medical condition, your doctor will likely assess whether the anti-inflammatory benefits outweigh any psychological risks.

What are the benefits of marijuana?

Currently, there are two synthetic versions of marijuana. Doctors prescribe them for the treatment of severe epilepsy and chemotherapy side effects.

The following list of marijuana benefits are some of the most commonly discussed in scientific research, as well as anecdotally.

Pain management

The cannabinoids in marijuana may reduce pain by altering pain perception pathways in the brain. This may be helpful to treat conditions that cause chronic pain, such as:

  • arthritis
  • fibromyalgia
  • endometriosis
  • migraine

It may also minimize cancer treatment side effects, like loss of appetite.

In some instances, medical marijuana is reported to help replace the long-term use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) like ibuprofen, which can have negative side effects.

Reduced inflammation

CBD in marijuana is thought to help reduce inflammation. In theory, this may benefit inflammatory conditions, such as:

  • Crohn’s disease
  • irritable bowel syndrome
  • rheumatoid arthritis

Decreasing inflammation in the body can also improve overall health.

Neurological and mental disorders

Due to its effects on the limbic system, doctors sometimes prescribe marijuana to treat the following neurological and mental health conditions:

  • anxiety
  • epilepsy
  • multiple sclerosis
  • Parkinson’s disease
  • post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)
  • Tourette syndrome

Sleep management

The relaxing effects of marijuana may help improve sleep disorders, such as insomnia. And improved sleep may also occur when pain is reduced from marijuana usage.

What are the risks of marijuana?

Marijuana is said to have opioid-like effects on the central nervous system. However, it poses much fewer risks than synthetic opioids. It’s also not considered as addictive as other substances.

Those are two reasons why many advocates are pushing for marijuana legalization, so patients can have safer options for pain management. In fact, some people use marijuana as a way to treat opioid addiction.

Still, the potential risks of marijuana need to be considered in equal measure. Below are some of the side effects you should discuss with your doctor:

  • Hallucinogenic effects. Marijuana may cause mild hallucinations, poor motor skills, or altered perceptions of reality. For these reasons, certain activities may be unsafe after using marijuana, such as operating heavy machinery. Do not drive after using marijuana. Not only is it unsafe, but it is illegal in every state to drive after using marijuana — even in states in which marijuana use is legal.
  • Depressant-like effects. Marijuana may cause depressant effects, similar to those seen with alcohol use. You may feel calm and relaxed but also have issues with coordination and concentration. Some people may also feel depressive symptoms as a side effect.
  • Stimulating effects. Marijuana may boost mood, but it may also cause hyperactivity, rapid breathing, and increases in both blood pressure and heart rate. These effects aren’t as common in marijuana compared to depressant effects.
  • Other side effects. These may include bloodshot eyes, dry mouth, and increased appetite.

It’s important to know that the side effects of marijuana can vary between people. You may not know your exact experiences until after you’ve used it.

The legal issues

As of January 2020, 11 states as well as Washington, D.C., have legalized recreational marijuana, and 33 states have legalized it for medical use. However, marijuana itself is still considered illegal under federal law.

So, what does this mean if you’re interested in using marijuana for medical purposes?

First, talk to your doctor about the pros and cons of marijuana for your condition.

Next, look up the laws in your state. Even if marijuana is legal in your state, you could be prosecuted for using it if you travel to a different state where it’s not legal. Plan accordingly to avoid any legal issues.

It’s also important to distinguish the difference between marijuana and CBD.

Hemp-derived CBD products (with less than 0.3 percent THC) are legal on the federal level but are still illegal under some state laws.

Marijuana-derived CBD products are illegal on the federal level but are legal under some state laws.

Check your state’s laws and those of anywhere you travel. Keep in mind that nonprescription CBD products aren’t approved by the Food and Drug Administration and may be inaccurately labeled.

The takeaway

Marijuana is perhaps one of the most contentious topics today, both from a legal and health perspective.

More research on the benefits of marijuana for your health is needed for both sides of the debate to come to an agreement on its use in medical and recreational settings.

In the meantime, if you’re interested in the potential benefits of marijuana for your own health, it’s important to reach out to a doctor first. They can help guide you through the benefits versus any potential risks, as well as the legalities behind obtaining a medical marijuana card, depending on where you live.

Never try any drug or substance to treat a medical condition on your own. This includes plant-based sources like marijuana.

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Weedheads NFT

Weedheads NFT

Weedheads is a collection of 10,000 unique, randomly generated arts for supporting and legalising the use of marijuana for medicinal and recreational purposes.